Wheel

Ask ScooterDad: We recently bought our 9 year old a Fuzion Z375. He wants to ride it to school. He previously didn't lock up his little Razor scooter, but we woukd like to find a way to lock up his Fuzion,

Submitter's Name: 
Karen
Submitter's Location: 
Dallas, TX
Answer: 

I think a steel cable lock that is fairly small should fit through the fork above the wheel or around the rear wheel dropout, then you can wrap the other end around a bar and secure it. Something like this might work: http://www.amazon.com/Bosvision-Ultra-Secure-Combination-Retractable-Sno...

You'll probably have to take your scooter to a bike shop, Target, Wal-Mart, or other store that sells bike locks to see if the cable is narrow enough to go through the fork or dropout. It looks like going through the fork and the spokes in the wheel might be an option as well.

Ask ScooterDad: i want to switch wheels on my scooter but i cant because the front wheel axle is stripped...what do i do?

Submitter's Name: 
jacob porter
Submitter's Location: 
flint michigan
Answer: 

Try cutting a slit in the head of the bolt with a hacksaw or rotary tool. If you can cut a slit, you can use a flathead screwdriver to turn the axle. You can also try jamming a screwdriver between the head of the bolt and the side of the fork so you can turn the axle from the other side.

Removing Bearings from Metal Core Wheels

Removing Bearings from Metal Core Wheels

Having trouble removing bearings from your metal core wheels? Try using the bearing spacer trick!

Everyone wants metal core wheels because of their superior strength, performance, and durability. However, they have one disadvantage over plastic core wheels: they are much more difficult to get bearings in and out of because they do not flex at all. There are some tricks to removing bearings from metal core wheels and I'm going to show you one method that utilizes the bearing spacer.

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What are the Basic Parts of a Scooter?

What are the Basic Parts of a Scooter?

The first step to maintaining your scooter is knowing what all the parts are. It's a lot easier to order a new "fork" than it is to order a "you know, that long metal thingy with the tube part and the U-shaped part that holds the spinny jobby". :o)

Many of you reading this blog will undoubtedly know quite a bit about scooter parts already, but since the focus of my blog is educating beginners and parents, I thought it wouldn't hurt to write an article outlining the basic parts of a freestyle scooter. If you already know what all the parts on a scooter are, then move along, these aren't the droids you're looking for. However, if you're brand new to scootering, then hopefully this article will be a helpful starting point in getting you familiar with freestyle scooter parts.

When someone at the skate park tells you that you need a new headset, you might not even know what a headset is, so how can you determine if you truly need a new one? Many of the parts on a scooter will have names that are easily identifiable and recognizable to you have any experience with bikes, motorcycles, or other similar riding equipment. For the sake of being thorough, I'll cover all the major parts.

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Removing Flat Spots and Resurfacing Scooter Wheels

Removing Flat Spots and Resurfacing Scooter Wheels

Removing flat spots from scooter wheels can save you money, but it can also be dangerous. Always be extremely careful when operating power tools.

If you've ever bought expensive wheels for your kid, you know how frustrating it can be for both you and your kid when he develops a flat spot on the wheel. This can be frustrating even if the wheels were relatively inexpensive. While wheels are a consumable part of a scooter, that doesn't mean that you should have to burn through them like a tank of gas in your car. The more expensive wheels are typically made from a better quality compound so they last longer, but they, too, can experience flat spots, uneven wear, or chunking.

As your scooter kid's talent and the parts on his scooter improve, flat spots become less of a worry. Sadly, however, the most common cause of flat spots that we experience today are from non-scooter kids that get a hold of Paxton's scooter. They don't understand that locking up the brake and skidding the scooter will ruin the wheels. This is one reason that we tell our scooter kid to only let people that he trusts ride his scooter.

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Tips for Installing Wheel Bearings

Tips for Installing Wheel Bearings

Installing bearings can be a pain, but a few simple tips can make that process easier.

Once you've made the move from plastic core wheels to metal core wheels, you probably know how frustrating it can be to install bearings. The actual act of installing bearings isn't that hard, but doing it the right way without damaging or distoring them to the point where they don't function as intended can be difficult. Often, you'll have to beat the bearings into the wheels because wheel manufacurers don't have the best production tolerances. Once you start really hammering on the bearings, you're likely to damage or distort them.

After a couple years of installing bearings, here are a few tips that I've learned to help reduce headaches related to this process. You're going to have to do this often for your kid and his friends, so you better learn how to do it sooner rather than later.

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