Parts

Ask ScooterDad: How do you know what kind of parts fit the parts that you want or have

Submitter's Name: 
Brandon arias
Submitter's Location: 
Ventura California
Answer: 

It's a learning process. You can learn what types of parts will work together. You can also try our Scooter Configurator. Your best option is to speak to a retailer who will know all the parts they carry and the compability. Inward Scooters is great about helping people figure out what will work together so you can order the right combination of parts from them.

Ask ScooterDad: want to put apex bars on new scooter how do I do that ? also to do a full custom scooter up can you list all parts needed in doing this ?

Submitter's Name: 
lin
Submitter's Location: 
Brisbane
Answer: 

There are two different types of Apex bars (standard and oversized) and which kind you need depends on what the rest of your setup requires.

For a custom scooter, generally, the parts you need are:

  • Deck
  • Fork
  • Bars
  • Headset
  • Clamp of some kind with associated compression mechanism that works with headset, fork, and bars
  • Wheels
  • Bearings
  • Bearing spacers
  • Axels
  • Wheel spacers (rear, unless brake has a carrier with built in spacers; some forks need wheel spacers as well)
  • Brake
  • Grip tape
  • Grips

Scooter Configurator - New Feature to Help Determine Scooter Parts Compatibility

Scooter Configurator - New Feature to Help Determine Scooter Parts Compatibility

Having a hard time figuring out what parts will work on your scooter? Try the new Scooter Configurator from ScooterDad.com!

I get a lot of emails, Facebook messages, YouTube comments, as well as kids and parents in person asking me about parts compatibility. Nearly every question revolves around the compatibility of forks, bars, headsets, and clamps/compression systems. This is by far the most difficult part of building a scooter for people who aren't already deep into the sport. Because freestyle scootering is still a very new sport, a lack of industry standards and definitive best practices has led to a wide range of parts and technology implementations. While innovation and variety are great for the progression of scooter parts, it has made the situation difficult for parents and kids who are trying to learn about building scooters.

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Lucky HIC Installation

Lucky HIC Installation

HIC stands for Hidden Internal Compression

It seems that Hidden Internal Compression (HIC) systems are becoming more and more popular among freestyle scooter riders. This is because they are simple, cheap, and light compared to SCS systems, which we covered in another tutorial found here: Proto SCS Installation.

The HIC system uses a shim to extend the reach of the fork into the bars and prevent the fork from pulling out of the headtube. The tutorial video in this article uses a Lucky HIC composite shim, Lucky HIC bars, and Lucky HIC oversized clamp, but other HIC systems should work similarly. In terms of true HIC, we've been extremely happy with the Lucky setup.

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Proto SCS Installation

Proto SCS Installation

Installing an SCS clamp system isn't as scary as it seems.

Installing a Standard Compression System (SCS) clamp can be tricky if no one has shown you how to do it right. Even after you get your SCS installed, it can be challenging to get it locked down just right. When dealing with an SCS, the first and most important precaution you should keep in mind is to not let anyone that you don't trust mess with it. Often times, someone might be trying to help when they think they know what they are doing and they might accidentally wreck your $80 clamp. I don't let anyone else work on my kid's scooters not because I don't trust them, but because if I screw it up, then I have to pay for it. If someone else breaks a part, I don't want to deal with that awkward interaction of who has to pay for it.

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Clamp Expansion with the Penny Trick

Clamp Expansion with the Penny Trick

A penny is the cheapest tool you can keep in your scooter toolbox!

It can often be difficult to get a clamp and bars to fit together if the clamp is a tight fit for the bars. You don't want to use grease to make them fit together as it will be difficult to get a secure fit later on after you tighten everything. The best method for expanding your clamp for easily fitting it on to your bars is to use the penny trick.

The method outlined below will work for standard clamps, HIC clamps, SCS clamps, and it might even work with the Phoenix iHIC bars/clamp system, but I haven't had a chance to try it out with those yet.

As always, use T-handle allen key wrenches rather than L-shaped allen keys. You can buy a full set of T-handle metric allen keys for less than $10 at Harbor Freight and I highly recommend that you do so.

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