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Scooter Configurator - New Feature to Help Determine Scooter Parts Compatibility

Scooter Configurator - New Feature to Help Determine Scooter Parts Compatibility

Having a hard time figuring out what parts will work on your scooter? Try the new Scooter Configurator from ScooterDad.com!

I get a lot of emails, Facebook messages, YouTube comments, as well as kids and parents in person asking me about parts compatibility. Nearly every question revolves around the compatibility of forks, bars, headsets, and clamps/compression systems. This is by far the most difficult part of building a scooter for people who aren't already deep into the sport. Because freestyle scootering is still a very new sport, a lack of industry standards and definitive best practices has led to a wide range of parts and technology implementations. While innovation and variety are great for the progression of scooter parts, it has made the situation difficult for parents and kids who are trying to learn about building scooters.

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Clamp Expansion with the Penny Trick

Clamp Expansion with the Penny Trick

A penny is the cheapest tool you can keep in your scooter toolbox!

It can often be difficult to get a clamp and bars to fit together if the clamp is a tight fit for the bars. You don't want to use grease to make them fit together as it will be difficult to get a secure fit later on after you tighten everything. The best method for expanding your clamp for easily fitting it on to your bars is to use the penny trick.

The method outlined below will work for standard clamps, HIC clamps, SCS clamps, and it might even work with the Phoenix iHIC bars/clamp system, but I haven't had a chance to try it out with those yet.

As always, use T-handle allen key wrenches rather than L-shaped allen keys. You can buy a full set of T-handle metric allen keys for less than $10 at Harbor Freight and I highly recommend that you do so.

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Installing Scooter Grips Easily with an Air Compressor

Installing Scooter Grips Easily with an Air Compressor

Believe it or not, this is the 3rd set of bars these pink grips have been on. Using the air compressor technique, I've been able to easily move them without damaging the grips.

If you haven't installed a thousand pairs of scooter grips yet, don't worry...you will.

Grips are usually one of the last things added to a scooter during a built and since they are a relatively minor part, it's really frustrating to scooter kids when they have to wait for grips to dry. Traditional methods for installing grips involve using some kind of relatively quick drying lubricant to allow the grips to slip on to the bars. I have typically used a light mixture of dish washing soap and water, mostly water, to install grips. Windex can also work and I've heard of people using spray paint as well because it dries sticky and acts like glue to a certain extent. I would personally avoid spray paint because of the PAINT aspect of it, which can ruin the finish on your bars and over-spray on to anything around you. It's messy and unnecessarily mars your parts.

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What are the Basic Parts of a Scooter?

What are the Basic Parts of a Scooter?

The first step to maintaining your scooter is knowing what all the parts are. It's a lot easier to order a new "fork" than it is to order a "you know, that long metal thingy with the tube part and the U-shaped part that holds the spinny jobby". :o)

Many of you reading this blog will undoubtedly know quite a bit about scooter parts already, but since the focus of my blog is educating beginners and parents, I thought it wouldn't hurt to write an article outlining the basic parts of a freestyle scooter. If you already know what all the parts on a scooter are, then move along, these aren't the droids you're looking for. However, if you're brand new to scootering, then hopefully this article will be a helpful starting point in getting you familiar with freestyle scooter parts.

When someone at the skate park tells you that you need a new headset, you might not even know what a headset is, so how can you determine if you truly need a new one? Many of the parts on a scooter will have names that are easily identifiable and recognizable to you have any experience with bikes, motorcycles, or other similar riding equipment. For the sake of being thorough, I'll cover all the major parts.

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