Scooter Maintenance

Installing Scooter Grips Easily with an Air Compressor

Installing Scooter Grips Easily with an Air Compressor

Believe it or not, this is the 3rd set of bars these pink grips have been on. Using the air compressor technique, I've been able to easily move them without damaging the grips.

If you haven't installed a thousand pairs of scooter grips yet, don't worry...you will.

Grips are usually one of the last things added to a scooter during a built and since they are a relatively minor part, it's really frustrating to scooter kids when they have to wait for grips to dry. Traditional methods for installing grips involve using some kind of relatively quick drying lubricant to allow the grips to slip on to the bars. I have typically used a light mixture of dish washing soap and water, mostly water, to install grips. Windex can also work and I've heard of people using spray paint as well because it dries sticky and acts like glue to a certain extent. I would personally avoid spray paint because of the PAINT aspect of it, which can ruin the finish on your bars and over-spray on to anything around you. It's messy and unnecessarily mars your parts.

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Removing Flat Spots and Resurfacing Scooter Wheels

Removing Flat Spots and Resurfacing Scooter Wheels

Removing flat spots from scooter wheels can save you money, but it can also be dangerous. Always be extremely careful when operating power tools.

If you've ever bought expensive wheels for your kid, you know how frustrating it can be for both you and your kid when he develops a flat spot on the wheel. This can be frustrating even if the wheels were relatively inexpensive. While wheels are a consumable part of a scooter, that doesn't mean that you should have to burn through them like a tank of gas in your car. The more expensive wheels are typically made from a better quality compound so they last longer, but they, too, can experience flat spots, uneven wear, or chunking.

As your scooter kid's talent and the parts on his scooter improve, flat spots become less of a worry. Sadly, however, the most common cause of flat spots that we experience today are from non-scooter kids that get a hold of Paxton's scooter. They don't understand that locking up the brake and skidding the scooter will ruin the wheels. This is one reason that we tell our scooter kid to only let people that he trusts ride his scooter.

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Scooter Customization on the Cheap - Creative Grip Tape

Scooter Customization on the Cheap - Creative Grip Tape

Grip tape is pretty cheap and you can do some cool things with it if you get creative!

Recently, I wrote an article titled Swap Meet - Frequent Part Swapping in Scooter Culture where I discussed an aspect of freestyle scooter culture pertaining to a constant upgrading and swapping parts. I also mentioned in this article that replacing grips and grip tape are a relatively cheap way to make changes to your scooter.

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Tips for Installing Wheel Bearings

Tips for Installing Wheel Bearings

Installing bearings can be a pain, but a few simple tips can make that process easier.

Once you've made the move from plastic core wheels to metal core wheels, you probably know how frustrating it can be to install bearings. The actual act of installing bearings isn't that hard, but doing it the right way without damaging or distoring them to the point where they don't function as intended can be difficult. Often, you'll have to beat the bearings into the wheels because wheel manufacurers don't have the best production tolerances. Once you start really hammering on the bearings, you're likely to damage or distort them.

After a couple years of installing bearings, here are a few tips that I've learned to help reduce headaches related to this process. You're going to have to do this often for your kid and his friends, so you better learn how to do it sooner rather than later.

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Dialing a District V2's Brake

Dialing a District V2's Brake

Stopping the rattle on a District V2's brake is easier than you think!

One of my scooter kid's competition scooters has a District V2 deck and, as much as he loves it, it has always bother me how much the brake rattles. He usually complains about his scooter not being "dialed", but for some reason he has overlooked it on this deck, although I think it has secretly bothered him. Despite the rattling brake, the District V2 deck is a great deck for younger kids who can benefit from a lighter deck with a wide, flat grinding/stalling surface.

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